Home > Monthly Meeting > 3/10/2010 Implementing Evolutionary Architecture – Neal Ford / Writing Testable Code – Jim McMaster

3/10/2010 Implementing Evolutionary Architecture – Neal Ford / Writing Testable Code – Jim McMaster

Our March Meeting will be on 3/10/2010 at the TIV 320 AB – Baerresen Ballroom.
Neal Ford will be the featured speaker on “Evolutionary Architecture”
and Jim McMaster will give the first talk/lecture on “Writing Testable Code”

The address for the Tivoli Building is: 900 Auraria Parkway Denver, CO 80204-1852

Schedule

5:30-6:00 PM Refreshments and Networking
6:00-7:00 PM Writing Testable Code
7:00-7:05 PM Short break
7:05-7:15 PM Announcements
7:15-8:45 PM Evolutionary Architecture
     8:45 PM Door prize raffle

First Session/Basic Concepts

Writing Testable Code

Writing tests is easy, right?  Anyone can use JUnit.  The hard part is writing your code so it is easy (or even possible) to test.  Tonight, we’ll talk about some techniques for making your code easier to test, and some pitfalls to avoid.  If you wish to get the slides from the presentation, please contact Jim ( jmcmaster<at>google<dot>com ) and he can give you a copy.  Corporate requirements Jim works under do not allow it to be posted here on the site.

About The Speaker

Jim McMaster has been writing code since it was punched on cards.  In recent years, he has become a fan of developer testing.  He is a Software Engineer at Google, Inc. in Boulder.  He mainly works on Google Docs, and acts as world-wide publisher for Testing on the Toilet.

Main/Featured talk

Evolutionary Architecture

This talk describes an agile approach to architecture, and merges the current state-of-the-art thinking in both service oriented architectures(SOA) and web-based architectures like HTTP and REST.
In software, architecture and design are separate concepts. Emergent design allows you to change the overall design of your code, but you must have a baseline architecture in place. That doesn’t mean that you can’t allow your architecture to evolve over time, and that’s what this session covers. In this session I described how to use web technologies (HTTP, REST, etc) to implement robust, scalable enterprise architecture.
This talk is based on original research and development done by ThoughtWorks, and represents the current state of the art in building truly scalable enterprise architectures. This topic combines the subjects of service oriented architecture with web technologies to create a hybrid providing you with the benefits of both approaches.

This talk describes an agile approach to architecture, and merges the current state-of-the-art thinking in both service oriented architectures(SOA) and web-based architectures like HTTP and REST.
In software, architecture and design are separate concepts. Emergent design allows you to change the overall design of your code, but you must have a baseline architecture in place. That doesn’t mean that you can’t allow your architecture to evolve over time, and that’s what this session covers. In this session I described how to use web technologies (HTTP, REST, etc) to implement robust, scalable enterprise architecture.This talk is based on original research and development done by ThoughtWorks, and represents the current state of the art in building truly scalable enterprise architectures. This topic combines the subjects of service oriented architecture with web technologies to create a hybrid providing you with the benefits of both approaches.

About The Speaker

Neal is Software Architect and Meme Wrangler at ThoughtWorks, a global IT consultancy with an exclusive focus on end-to-end software development and delivery.

Before joining ThoughtWorks, Neal was the Chief Technology Officer at The DSW Group, Ltd., a nationally recognized training and development firm. Neal has a degree in Computer Science from Georgia State University specializing in languages and compilers and a minor in mathematics specializing in statistical analysis.

He is also the designer and developer of applications, instructional materials, magazine articles, video presentations, and author of 6 books, including the most recent The Productive Programmer. His language proficiencies include Java, C#/.NET, Ruby, Groovy, functional languages, Scheme, Object Pascal, C++, and C. His primary consulting focus is the design and construction of large-scale enterprise applications. Neal has taught on-site classes nationally and internationally to all phases of the military and to many Fortune 500 companies. He is also an internationally acclaimed speaker, having spoken at over 100 developer conferences worldwide, delivering more than 600 talks. If you have an insatiable curiosity about Neal, visit his web site at http://www.nealford.com. He welcomes feedback and can be reached at nford@thoughtworks.com.

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Categories: Monthly Meeting
  1. admin
    March 18, 2010 at 7:58 am

    Martin Fowler (fellow ThoughtWorker) did a write-up on his bliki about the ReST maturity model that Neal described in his talk.

    http://martinfowler.com/articles/richardsonMaturityModel.html

  2. April 2, 2010 at 4:03 pm

    I asked Neal about the possibility of completely driving a UI off of the hypermedia concept. It looks like the author of restfulie put together a generic hypermedia-aware client for ReST. Kind of cool.

    http://github.com/caelum/rest-client

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